5 Running Workouts you can do anywhere

There is a little running experience a lot of trainers refer to as Single Speed Running, this is a sensation where a runner logs nearly all of his or her running workouts at the exact same percentile effort. Day after day, week after week and year after year eeeeeeek. This speed is usually around 75 percent of max effort, not fast enough to really make your body work hard and adapt, but too fast to build much endurance or count as a LISS (Low intensity steady state) run. Does this sound a little bit like you?! don’t panic, since that’s exactly what most runners do, whether they’re training for a marathon, or a 10km.

We need super slow runs just as much as we need hardout sprints. The variety works the different energy systems and muscles in different ways and makes room for both strength-building and recovery. Not only does Single Speed Running keep you from getting stronger; it also significantly increases the risk of injury: our bodies crave variety.

Option 1:

Do this: Find a 100-meter long hill with a slight 2 to 3 percent downhill grade. Begin running around 70 percent your max effort and let gravity increase your stride rate and speed as you progress down the hill.

For recovery, slowly jog back up the hill. As you gain speed and fitness, bump up the number of hills you’re completing each week.

  • Week 1: 8 downhill sprints, 2:00 jogging recovery up hill
  • Week 2: 10 downhill sprints, 2:00 jogging recovery up hill
  • Week 3: 12 downhill sprints, 2:00 jogging recovery up hill

Proper mechanics are critical during downhill running, so work on maintaining your form and staying under control. With increased turnover, don’t fall into the trap of overstriding and braking on your heels.

Option 2:

Do this: start with an all-out 30-meter sprint, then walk or jog for 70 meters.

For the next 100 meters, run all-out for 40 meters, then walk or jog for 60 meters. Keep building up until you reach a 90-meter sprint with a 10-meter recovery, and then work back down the pyramid. See the workout below.

  • Interval 1: sprint 30 meters, walk/jog 70 meters
  • Interval 2: sprint 40 meters, walk/jog 60 meters
  • Interval 3: sprint 50 meters, walk/jog 50 meters
  • Interval 4: sprint 60 meters, walk/jog 40 meters
  • Interval 5: sprint 70 meters, walk/jog 30 meters
  • Interval 6: sprint 80 meters, walk/jog 20 meters
  • Interval 7: sprint 90 meters, walk/jog 10 meters
  • Interval 8: sprint 80 meters, walk/jog 20 meters
  • Interval 9: sprint 70 meters, walk/jog 30 meters
  • Interval 10: sprint 60 meters, walk/jog 40 meters
  • Interval 11: sprint 50 meters, walk/jog 50 meters
  • Interval 12: sprint 40 meters, walk/jog 60 meters
  • Interval 13: sprint 30 meters, walk/jog 70 meters

Ladder workouts involve running intervals of increasing distance and then retracing your steps and working your way back down.

Option 3:

Do this: Mark off 50 and 100 Metres, then perform the sprints described below. Rest 30 seconds between rounds 1 through 5, one minute between rounds 6 through 10.

  • Round 1: 50 Metres at 60% , backpedal to return
  • Round 2: 50 Metres at 60%, backpedal to return
  • Round 3: 50 Metres at 75% speed, backpedal to return
  • Round 4: 50 Metres at 75% speed, backpedal to return
  • Round 5: 50 Metres at 100% speed, backpedal to return
  • Round 6: 100 Metres at 70% speed, backpedal to return
  • Round 7: 100 Metres at 70% speed, backpedal to return
  • Round 8: 100 Metres at 85% speed, backpedal to return
  • Round 9: 100 Metres at 85%speed, backpedal to return
  • Round 10: 100 Metres at 100% speed, backpedal to return

Just because you’re sprinting doesn’t mean you should immediately hit the ground running at a breakneck pace. Instead, build up to full-speed with some build reps. You’ll help protect your hamstrings, avoid burning out quicker, and develop more speed.

Option 4:

Ladder workouts involve running intervals of increasing distance and then retracing your steps and working your way back down.

Do this: Run 10 x 200-meter intervals somewhere between 30 to 36 seconds each, depending on your fitness level. Rest after each interval close to four times your run, so about 2 minutes.

See the example plan below that will help you increase your speed and cut your rest time each week.

  • Week 1: 10 x 200 meters at 30-40 seconds with 2:00 minutes rest
  • Week 2: 9 x 200 meters at 29-39 seconds with 1:56 minutes rest
  • Week 3: 8 x 200 meters at 28-38 seconds with 1:52 minutes rest
  • Week 4: 7 x 200 meters at 27-37 seconds with 1:48 minutes rest

Interval training is all about balancing high-intensity bursts of speed with recovery time. Not only will they help you improve aerobic capacity and speed, the calorie burn can’t be beat.

Option 5:

Do this: Find a steep hill sprint up it for 20m at 70 percent effort. Walk back down the hill to recover. That’s 1 round. Do 6 to 8 rounds.

  • Workout 1: 8 hills, 20m at 70% intensity
  • Workout 2: 10 hills, 20m at 70% intensity
  • Workout 3: 12 hills, 20m at 70% intensity
  • Workout 4: 8 hills, 30 to 40m at 80% intensity
  • Workout 5: 10 hills, 30 to 40m at 80% intensity
  • Workout 6: 12 hills, 30 to 40m at 80% intensity

Once you’ve mastered this sprint workout twice a week, you’re ready to bump up the difficulty. For the greatest fat loss, this should be a continuous workout, requiring you to walk back down the hill after each sprint and immediately starting the next interval again.

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